Are you struggling to find the words to pray? Not knowing what to say or how to say it?
Prayer is a part of our spirituality, it is part of our relationship with God (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). Just start by saying hello “Good morning God, thank you for the new day.”, tell God (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit), that you love Him. Prayer can be that simple.

Second, ask God for help with your prayer (pray about your prayer). Dormant does not mean dead. No matter how long it has been since the last time you prayed, today is a good time to restart a life of prayer. Start with something simple “Jesus, I love you”.

A personal note: the same principles can be applied to my dormant (six months) blog. It is time for me to restart my writing.

O give thanks to the LORD, for he is good;
for his mercy endures for ever! Psalm 106:1

 

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In all my temptations, I place my trust in you, O Sacred Heart of Jesus.
In all my weakness, I place my trust in you, O Sacred Heart of Jesus.
In all my difficulties, I place my trust in you, O Sacred Heart of Jesus.
In all my trials, I place my trust in you, O Sacred Heart of Jesus.
In all my sorrows, I place my trust in you, O Sacred Heart of Jesus.
In all my work, I place my trust in you, O Sacred Heart of Jesus.
In every failure, I place my trust in you, O Sacred Heart of Jesus.
In every discouragement, I place my trust in you, O Sacred Heart of Jesus.
In life and in death, I place my trust in you, O Sacred Heart of Jesus.
In time and eternity, I place my trust in you, O Sacred Heart of Jesus.
The Essential Catholic Prayer Book, Liguori Publications 1999,  page 87.
 sacred-heart-trust

In my weekly hospice ministry, I pray this a lot with/for patients.  While it is a prayer that brings an inner peace for those who are terminally ill and may have a few weeks to live, it is also a beautiful prayer to those who have a few decades (or more) yet to live.

In everything, I place my trust in you, O Sacred Heart of Jesus.
 (My short version of the prayer.)

Let me know You, O Lord, who knows me: let me know You, as I am known. O Lord, the Power of my soul, enter into it, and fit it for you, that You may have and hold it without spot or wrinkle. This is my hope, therefore do I speak; and in this hope do I rejoice, when I rejoice healthfully. Other things of this life are the less to be sorrowed for, the more they are sorrowed for; and the more to be sorrowed for, the less men sorrow for them. For behold, You love the truth, and he that does it, comes to the light. This would I do in my heart before You in confession: and in my writing, before many witnesses.

Saint Augustine Bishop of Hippo, The Confessions of St. Augustine, Book 10, chapter 1.

…every event and need can become an offering of thanksgiving. The letters of St. Paul often begin and end with thanksgiving, and the Lord Jesus is always present in it:

“Give thanks in all circumstances; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you”; 1 Thessalonians 5:18;

“Continue steadfastly in prayer, being watchful in it with thanksgiving.”Colossians 4:2

Catholic Church, Catechism of the Catholic Church, 2nd Ed. (Washington, DC: United States Catholic Conference, 2000), #2638.

 

My notes:  I sometimes seams like all we ever do in prayer is ask for things. Which is fine, a prayer of petition is good. We need to also include prayers of thanksgiving as part of our personal relationship with God our Father, Jesus our Brother and the Holy Spirit.

Confidence in God is the very soul of prayer.   Venerable Fr. Solaris Casey

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What is the secret of the heart? It is the tender clement love of the Holy Spirit for every human person. The Holy Spirit, the “hidden” Person of the Trinity, caries on a delicate “love affair” with the soul from deep within the human heart. The spirit yearns to make the seed of faith implanted at baptism grow and blossom. The Spirit, the breath of love between the Father and the Son, whispers God’s loving desires into the depths of an open, docile heart.

— “The Secret of the Heart: A Theological Study of Catherine of Siena’s Teaching on the Heart of Jesus. Sr. Mary Jeremiah, 1995 Christendom Press, page 114”

Open to me now through his body’s wounds are his heart’s secret, the great mystery of love “the merciful heart of our God who has visited us from on high.” What kind of heart do the wounds reveal? A gentile, sweet and most merciful heart! Can anyone show greater mercy than to lay down his life for those condemned to death?

St. Bernard of Clairvaux (1090-1153), Sermon 61 on the Song of Songs.